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Page history last edited by Amanda 7 years, 4 months ago

I compared four editions of the 1923 Newbery winner, The Voyages of Doctor Dolittle:


 

A 1950 edition, illustrated by Hugh Lofting, and published by J. B. Lippincott Company - No ISBN. The original Hugh Lofting 1922 copyright was renewed in 1950 by his widow, Josephine. The copy I used was a 35th impression, purchased April 8, 1964, for my university library. This edition is the same as that available online at Project Gutenberg, at least for the passages described in this paper. The civil rights movement was in its early stages in 1964, and it is doubtful that any of this edition differs from the original. Hereafter referred to as 1922/1950;

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

A June 1988 edition, illustrated by Hugh Lofting, published by Bantam Doubleday Dell – ISBN 0440400023. This edition lists the copyrights of the 1922/1950 edition plus a “revised edition copyright” in 1988 by Christopher Lofting, Hugh’s son, who also wrote an afterword for this edition. Hereafter referred to as 1988;

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


The 1998 Illustrated Junior Library edition, published by Grosset & Dunlap, with illustrations by Sonja Lumat – ISBN 0448418630, hereafter referred to as 1998; and

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


A 2001 edition illustrated by Michael Hague, published by HarperCollins – ISBN 0688140025. This edition has a foreword copyrighted by Patricia C. and Frederick L. McKissack, and an afterword copyrighted by Peter Glassman. Hereafter referred to as 2001.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

1988 and 2001 are upfront about changes being made from the original edition, in forewords or afterwords by the editors. As will become evident in this comparison, there are also many changes to the text of 1998 when compared to 1922/1950, but nowhere is this acknowledged, making some readers feel they are reading the “original” work.

 

 

EXPLANATIONS FOR REVISIONS BY THE EDITORS OF 1988 and 2001

 

FIRST APPEARANCE OF PRINCE BUMPO

 

OTHER EXAMPLES OF CHANGES PERTAINING TO SKIN COLOR

 

THE SONG OF THE TERRIBLE THREE

 

OTHER CHANGES

 

THE SLEEPING BEAUTY PASSAGE

 

ILLUSTRATIONS

 

REVISIONS THROUGH THE YEARS

 

CONCLUSION

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